Tweet like Carnegie

Baby Boomers and Gen Xers are surely familiar with the name Dale Carnegie, founder of the famous Dale Carnegie Institute and author of How to Win Friends and Influence People. He was actually B.B.B. (Before Baby Boomer). I even wonder if Gen Y ever heard his name.

His Dale Carnegie Course was the first to tap into the average American’s desire to have more self-confidence – and therefore personal and business success. (Sounds a lot like my favorite business advisor, Brad Farris.)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/26632408@N02/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/26632408@N02/

I haven’t thought about Dale Carnegie in a long time – not to say that it’s lost its mojo. I just don’t come across this highly regarded institution in my everyday travels. But the other day I saw a link to a special report called Dale Carnegie Training’s Secrets of Success in the Digital Age: Essentials of Engagement. I clicked on it immediately because I wanted to see what Dale had to say about social media. After all, I do have some insecurities about interacting online, which I admit, could be an age (Gen X) thing. I figured if there was ever a place that could provide perspective of the social media/digital world we live in, it would be Dale Carnegie. And I was right.

The four-page report lays it all out for you, reminding you of what’s important when it comes to interacting with others online. And not surprisingly, they are the same principles that you follow when communicating with people in person. The report starts off with three Carnegie-esque reminders:

  • Your lifetime earning power is directly related to your ability to influence others.
  • Your ability to be heard and make an impact in a world filled with self-promotional digital voices is impossible without skillful human interaction.
  • Your professional success is directly related to the strength of your key relationships.

So true, so true.

I think every tip in this report is valuable, but here are a few of the ones where I found myself saying “Yes, yes, yes!”:

  • Make your digital messages meaningful by removing your own agenda … try to communicate value to those who receive your message.
  • Resist badmouthing as your online differentiation strategy. You would think this would go without saying, but some business professionals don’t get it.
  • Do the accumulated digital messages you send tip toward affirmation or aloofness? The more they lean toward affirmation, the more influence you will have.
  • Resist telling others what you want; instead express a genuine interest in what they want.
  • People will detect your smile, even on social networks, so pass it along.

Even after 100 years, Dale’s still got it. You think? If he was still with us, what do you think he would be tweeting about? 

Bridget Ingebrigtsen

Bridget Ingebrigtsen owns Write On Command, a company that provides writing and editing services to businesses and not-for-profits. Bridget describes her six-year stint as Anchor Advisors' writer/editor as being "mutually beneficial" -- she helps Anchor Advisors keep their written projects on track and Anchor Advisors helps her keep her business on track. When she's not running her business, Bridget is running after her four children, two dogs and the latest in entertainment news. Connect with Bridget on Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Comments

  1. This fits perfectly with my thoughts this week posted in a blog called Social
    Media Etiquette – Some Things Never Change. Glad to see Dale Carnegie has stayed up to speed.Great article- I’m tweeting it.

  2. This fits perfectly with my thoughts this week posted in a blog called Social
    Media Etiquette – Some Things Never Change. Glad to see Dale Carnegie has stayed up to speed.Great article- I’m tweeting it.

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